Alexander of Hierapolis

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Alexander (Gr. Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'Module:Exponential search' not found.) of Hierapolis was the name of two different bishops of that city:[1]

  • Alexander, a bishop of Hierapolis in Phrygia, who flourished around the year 253. He was the author of a book titled On the new things introduced by Christ into the world (Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'Module:Exponential search' not found.), which is no longer extant.
  • Alexander, a bishop of Hierapolis, who flourished around the year 431. He was sent by John, bishop of Antioch, to advocate the cause of Nestorius at the Council of Ephesus. His hostility to Cyril of Alexandria was such that he openly charged him with Apollinarism, and rejected the communion of John, Theodoret, and the other Eastern bishops, on their reconciliation with him. He appealed to the pope, but was rejected, and was at last banished by the emperor Theodosius II to the mines of Famothis in Egypt, where he died. Twenty-three letters of his are extant in Latin in the Nova Collectio Conciliorum of Étienne Baluze, p. 670, &c. Paris, 1683.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christie, Albany James (1867). "Alexander". In William Smith (ed.). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. p. 116.
  2. ^ Alexander (early bishops) in the Catholic Encyclopedia.
  3. ^ Wace, William Henry (1911). Wace, William Henry (ed.). "A Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature". J. Murray. |contribution= ignored (help)

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1870).